You are here

Change To Prescription Security Paper Requirements

Change To Prescription Security Paper Requirements

August 13, 2013

ATLANTA  – During the 2012-2013 Legislative Session, the General Assembly passed House Bill (HB) 209, and Governor Nathan Deal signed it into law in April 2013.  The changes implemented by HB 209 took effect on July 1, 2013. HB 209 embodies a significant shift in regulation of prescription security paper for security paper vendors, members and licensees of the Board of Pharmacy, and all prescribing health care providers.    

HB 209 modifies the requirements for prescription security paper by repealing the previous legal requirement for the seal of the Board of Pharmacy to appear on all prescriptions. Effective July 1, 2013, where a prescription is written on security paper that meets Centers for Medicare & Medicaid Services (CMS) standards, a member and/or licensee of the Board of Pharmacy and any prescribing health care provider can use and accept it. Under HB 209, members and licensees of the Board of Pharmacy and all prescribing health care providers can legally accept a prescription written on paper without the seal of the Board of Pharmacy. 

The changes in the law effectively remove the necessity of the board to have a policy for the use of security paper for hard-copy prescription orders. Members and licensees of the Board of Pharmacy and all prescribing health care providers were previously required to have the seal on all prescriptions. 

About Georgia Board of Pharmacy

The Georgia State Board of Pharmacy is an eight-member board appointed by the Governor to protect, promote and preserve the public health, safety and welfare of the citizens of Georgia. The board is composed of seven licensed practicing pharmacists and one consumer member. They are responsible for the regulation of pharmacists and pharmacies in Georgia.

The board reviews applications, administers examinations, licenses qualified applicants, and regulates the practice of licensees throughout the state. Complaints are investigated and, if warranted, disciplinary action may be taken by the board.

Board meetings are held approximately 12 times each year at the Department of Community Health, 2 Peachtree Street, Atlanta, Ga., and are open to the public. Persons wishing to bring matters for the board’s consideration should submit a written request to the office. For more information, visit http://gbp.georgia.gov/ or contact us at 404-651-8000.

About the Georgia Department of Community Health

Through effective planning, purchasing and oversight, the Georgia Department of Community Health (DCH) provides access to affordable, quality health care to millions of Georgians, including some of the state’s uninsured and most vulnerable populations.

DCH is responsible for Medicaid and PeachCare for Kids,® the State Health Benefit Plan, Healthcare Facility Regulation and Health Information Technology in Georgia.

Clyde L. Reese III, Esq., serves as Commissioner for the Georgia Department of Community Health.

To learn more about DCH and its dedication to A Healthy Georgia, visit www.dch.georgia.gov.

                                                                 

-30-